The Andromeda Initiative sets a course for a new galaxy, hoping to find a new home for the species of the Milky Way.

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Sara Ryder (voice)
Tom Taylorson ...
Scott Ryder (voice)
Jules de Jongh ...
Cora Harper (voice)
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Jaal Ama Darav (voice)
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Liam Kosta (voice)
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Nakmor Drack (voice)
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Pelessaria 'Peebee' B'Sayle (voice)
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Vetra Nyx (voice)
Alexia Traverse-Healy ...
SAM (voice)
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Suvi Anwar (voice)
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Gil Brodie (voice)
Garett Ross ...
Kallo Jath (voice)
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Dr. Lexi T'Perro (voice)
Steve Pirot ...
Tiran Kandros (voice)
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Jarun Tann (voice)
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Storyline

A Pathfinder searches the galaxy Andromeda for a new home for Humanity since Earth has been threatened. This new prodigy can explore planets, customize their crew and vehicles while ridding the Andromeda galaxy of enemies for one purpose: To find a suitable planet to call 'Home'.

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Discover a New Galaxy


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21 March 2017 (USA)  »

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Bioware, the producers of this Mass Effect and the original trilogy, have hinted at the possibility of the original 3 Mass Effects being remastered on the Xbox One and PlayStation 4. Having been denied a remaster, Microsoft made 2 and 3 backward compatible on the N7 Anniversary in 2016. See more »

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Featured in The Angry Joe Show: Mass Effect: Andromeda (2017) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A Welcome and Natural Addition to the Series
20 March 2017 | by (Brooklyn, New York) – See all my reviews

IMDb limits length so this review will be a shortened version of my full found on my Twitter page @markouttv. The full version addresses the controversies surrounding the game prelaunch and is more in depth about the combat and characters.

It took time for me to get into the swing of this game and classify it as a welcome and natural continuation of the Mass Effect series. For one: the character models are flat out ugly. They quite frankly feel unfinished. It feels like they used Dragon Age: Inquisition's smooth and colorful models and tried to make them more realistic by adding extra texture and detail to the faces. But it ultimately results in this uncanny valley effect. Paired with the unnatural facial animations, and you are left with this strange midpoint between cartoony and realistic that is just strange. When your character first jolts on to screen, it is a bit shell-shocking. You are then immediately greeted by more characters, and they look no better. It may just be nostalgia talking so I'll have to look back, but I remember the models in even Mass Effects 3 looking better.

Adding to the rough start is the fact that it gets off to a very in my opinion rushed start. While I normally would praise a game for jumping right into the action and feel that more games should do it, Mass Effect is a series that values you taking your time. To boot, this game features a whole new story in a whole new galaxy with a whole new cast of characters. I would have preferred it if the game let you wake up, walk around a bit and learn who everyone was and heck, who YOU are. Instead, you wake up, you are engaged with dialogue, and suddenly, you are put to work. It's one of the few times I was aching for MORE exposition. Between the rushed intro and the ugly characters, I wouldn't blame most people from being turned off from the get go. It isn't until you are off the opening location (an ark named Hyperion, one of several arks designed to aid the Andromeda Initiative) that you can breathe and experience what this game really offers the Mass Effect universe. And that "something" is great.

Freedom.

I've often lamented the Mass Effect series for going in the wrong direction compared to where I thought it should go. Now while Mass Effect's 2 sequels are both great, I was disappointed that the games seemed to favor increased linearity over increased exploration, as I feel that a game that involves exploring space and building alliances lends itself to a more open world form of game-play. Instead, Mass Effect 2 featured smaller explorable hubs, including the comparatively tiny Citadel. And then Mass Effect 3 increased the size of the Citadel while offering less compelling additional areas. Since then, open world games have become an increasingly sexy genre in the gaming world, and while this leads to a lot of games that are tiring because they are poorly done open worlds with nothing more than repetitive busy work to fill the map or worse, gigantic maps with nothing to do in them (No Man's Sky), I always thought Mass Effect was a perfect candidate for a more open experience.

So when you arrive on your first mission you get a slice of the more open experience that will only become more open as the chains come off and you are left to your own devices.

Here is also when you will experience your first combat situations, and man. The combat is great. The combat seems to be a controversial subject to some people as the skill choices have become more streamlined and any limitations on weapon choice or play style based on class have been removed. The dirty word "casualization" will be thrown around plenty here, but more streamlined and enjoyable to play while still offering variety is not a bad thing. To boot skill selection is still up to the player and those choices will have a very material effect on how the game is played, making it no less of an RPG than previous iterations. Do you want to go all biotic to manipulate foes and hit them with devastating combinations (which I totally did)? Do you want to go all tech? Do you want to go all pure combat? Do you want a combination? It's up to you.

Further improving the combat is the movement, which was always an annoyance in the Mass Effect series. Before, Mass Effect was largely a pure cover shooter with an often-tricky camera and stoic movement. But now movement is a lot more flowing, making it much more fast- paced and fun. Cover now happens automatically when you move toward a wall with a weapon drawn and getting out of cover is as easy as just moving, making you feel much less stuck to walls. You can also now dash out of danger or quickly in for melee kills.

And the best new element of combat: the jet-pack. This adds a whole new level of verticality to the combat experience, as you can with ease jump to new ledges and buildings to gain a new perspective on the battlefield.

Maybe from the outside these changes seem radical, but when you play the game, the changes are nothing but a natural and welcome evolution to the Mass Effect formula.

After this tutorial mission the game begins to take shape. You now have an idea of who you are, what your mission is and your role in the game to come. You will soon be on your first proper planet complete with several side quests, ready to experience the truly great experience before you. If you try to get past the rocky start, you won't regret it.

Also it runs really well on PC.

8/10, very good


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